Kingston, ON, St. Lawrence River, to Trenton, ON, the Southern Entrance to the Trent-Severn Waterway

This morning we entered the Trent-Severn Waterway and are waiting on the "blue line" to start the first of 44 locks we will pass through over the next week or two.  We have been talking about this trip for months, years really.  Using Wikipedia's description, "The Trent–Severn Waterway is a 386 kilometres (240 mi)-long canal route connecting Lake Ontario at Trenton to Georgian Bay at Port Severn.  Its major natural waterways include the Trent River, Otonabee River, the Kawartha Lakes, Lake Simcoe, Lake Couchiching and the Severn River. Its scenic, meandering route has been called "one of the finest interconnected systems of navigation in the world".  [cited to"Trent-Severn National Historic Site", Parks Canada]

Most of the locks in the Trent are like those we've already done, but there are a couple of engineering marvels, most notably Peterborough Lift Lock and the Big Chute Railway.  I've included a link in case you're interested in seeing what I mean.  And of course, I will share our personal experience in future blogs.

https://www.trentsevern.com/index.php/waterway-index/locks-index/lock-index

On our way to Trenton, the starting point for the next leg of our journey, we spent a couple of days in Kingston at the Confederation Basin Marina and took advantage of our time there to take care of routine duties - marine supplies, laundry, etc.  Our visit to the marine supply store required a car rental, and after a bit of finagling, Enterprise Leasing gave us a great deal on a tiny car.  We were glad to have it but not just for errands.  The heat and humidity returned with a vengeance, so we spent a good part of the second day just driving around with the air conditioning on - really. 

Our little lifesaver

Our little lifesaver

We had planned to do some touring while in Kingston, as there are several historic points of interest, including the Penitentiary Museum (which is supposed to be fascinating) and Fort Henry, a restored 19th century military fort/museum that was quite close to the marina.  But other than our popsicle tour in the little blue car, we were content to enjoy time on the boat in view of the marina's own historic offering - the Shoal Tower.  I even got well into my second novel, something I've been too busy to do on this trip so far - really.

The Shoal Tower is one of four Martello towers built in Kingston as part of Britain's defense of colonial Canada in the 19th century and is a designated national historic site of Canada (thanks again, Wikipedia).

On Saturday we headed west.  I lied (unintentionally) in my previous post when I said we were headed into Lake Ontario.  Our westward cruise took us along the very northern edge of the Lake which I guess is still, technically, the St. Lawrence River.  We caught a few glimpses of the Lake and felt some swells, but that was the extent of our Great Lake experience at this point in our adventure.

We were held up briefly by a parade of kayaks and some swimmers crossing a large section of the river ...

We were held up briefly by a parade of kayaks and some swimmers crossing a large section of the river ...

That small dot in the upper right is actually a huge freighter headed out to sea, um, I mean into Lake Ontario.

That small dot in the upper right is actually a huge freighter headed out to sea, um, I mean into Lake Ontario.

We found what looked to be a nice anchorage halfway between Kingston and Trenton and decided to spend the night on the hook.  One of the things we've learned about the canals, rivers and lakes up here is that they are all very weedy, some more than others.  That was definitely the case in Wilton Bay,  The first time we dropped the anchor we knew it hadn't taken hold so we had to raise it to try a second time.  It looked like we had uprooted an actual Christmas tree from the bottom of the bay.  That explained it.

Our second attempt was successful, as we took strong hold in the muddy bottom (probably the one muddy spot left behind by the weeds we pulled up).  There in the bay we were protected from the strong southwest wind we'd been playing with all afternoon, and it was flat calm except for a little rocking and swaying.  We relaxed, enjoyed the quiet and watched the swans march their cygnets off to bed as the sun went down. 

I love the way this boat moves at anchor.  It literally rocked us to sleep.

Yesterday, Sunday, we hoisted anchor early in the morning - requiring another intense weed-thinning workout - and continued our way west.  We spent the night at the Trent Port Marina which is conveniently situated directly at the southern end of the Trent-Severn Waterway. 

We are ready to return to the smaller waterways and expect to reach Georgian Bay, and another milestone, in a week or two.